Polynesian Legend

A fact of life

The Waitaha tribe of New Zealand tells us that in maorí communities there are always men and women who prefer to elect partners, or lovers of the same sex…

“Some children are just born special.  Some have both poles existing in their bodies and feel the attraction for the same sex, and sometimes both sexes.  This was seen as something quite normal and natural, and never provoked any type of social pressure on the individual.  They are free spirits that follow their own road.  Sex converts are just as likely to care for the ill as they are to work in the gardens like the women. They are always available since they never menstruate.  These members of the community are respected and in some cases they are even seen as blessed. It is known that in the natural world, certain species respond to social crises in the community by electing same gender partners. Para los polinèsicos la homosexualidad es solo un “ hecho en la vida” , es una dificultad vital que hay que aceptar sin juzgar .

 

When necessary, equilibrium is re-established in the community by arranged marriages between men and women under the law known as Mokai Tomo.    This is a customary practice when there are intentions to emigrate and populate new lands. In this ceremony, wise men in the tribe elect couples to ensure a strong and healthy future for descendants.  After the birth of the first-born, the mother had the right to continue with her designated partner or elect another man with whom to make a family.  In ancient times this practice was also acceptable and respected.

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