Each newborn receives his Mauri, Varua, Ha y Hau

When Te Uru Tai flows from the womb of a fertile woman and joins Te Wai Tai, the seed of a man, a child begins to grow and form his Mauri, his physical appearance – the shape of his head, nose, eyes and body, his size, his personality.  All that we see has a Mauri. Each rock and each tree is different; each bird and each fish carries the Mauri of its species.

 

The Mauri of the child is tangible, but not his Varua (spirit) which is invisible.  The Varua is thought, talent, and power, and flows with two currents.  One current descends from the heaven and the earth, from Ranginui and Papatuanuku.  The spirit of an Ariki (noble) knows that they are joined.  The other current is the conscience which affects all the levels of the soul and the spirit.  The spirit takes the sculptor into the depths of the stone, takes the gardener to the germination of the seed and raises the navigator above the clouds to find the route to follow.

 

The ways of the Varua are open for all, since they come from Io Mata Ngaro (the supreme god), and we are from Io. Some enter the realm of the soul and the spirit; others only manage to see the gateway.  Only the Tohunga (the initiated) can go so far as to enter and open the baskets of wisdom.

 

The Ha of the child is the heart, the essence of his being.  The Hau is his breath, his life.  If we observe the fire, we can see the warm heart of the flames and its ever changing Mauri, and we know that the smoke is the Hau, the breath which escapes through our fingers.  When the flame dies, only its Varua remains.  When we die, only our Varua remains and those who accompany the dead will free it for its last voyage to Hawaikii (mythical homeland of the Polynesian peoples) among the stars.  When we are born, we receive our Varua from the stars and with our death, the Varua returns to them.

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