Te Mana o Te Vahine me Te Tane

There is a feminine form, just as there is a masculine form. The first serves to nurture and to give birth; the other to plant and to guard. With both of them, the tribe and the families of all nations survive, in each branch of the families of Atua from the high chief Ariki to the smallest of creatures invisible to our eyes. Those species which regenerate themselves have both of these systems which give life within. It is a great treasure.

Our ancestors studied carefully the fullness of the treasures of the universe. Through their detailed observations, time and again, they achieved Tikanga, the management of the various levels of understanding for the Hare Wananga, the school of occult knowledge and its practices. Some of this was kept within the Wananga of the grandmothers and other in the Wananga of the grandfathers. The two Wananga can be combined in one special Wananga which would reveal the teachings for the survival of the nation under Rongomaraeroa, the god of peace.

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Some patriarchal nations only recognize Mana, Tapu, Ihi, Wehi, Wana and Warua of the grandfathers. Matriarchal nations accept that these powers are held by both grandfathers and grandmothers, since the greatness of a nation is in the hands of both the feminine and the masculine. All that our founding ancestors have left us is written in the paintings in our sacred caves and on the boards of instruction. We have been essentially created, in one form or another, by the union of all the powers of the universe. These powers were acknowledged as the feminine power and the masculine power, in origin and in strength.

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